EMERGENCY NUMBERS
  • Municipal Police Coxen Hole: 2445-0416
  • Municipal Police Los Fuertes: 2445-3438
  • Red Cross: 3372-2582
  • Fire Brigade: 2445-0430 or 9919-8960
  • Municipal Police Coxen Hole: 2445-0416
  • Municipal Police Los Fuertes: 2445-3438
  • Red Cross: 3372-2582
  • Fire Brigade: 2445-0430 or 9919-8960
  • Municipal Police Coxen Hole: 2445-0416
  • Municipal Police Los Fuertes: 2445-3438
  • Red Cross: 3372-2582
  • Fire Brigade: 2445-0430 or 9919-8960
  • Municipal Police Coxen Hole: 2445-0416
  • Municipal Police Los Fuertes: 2445-3438
  • Red Cross: 3372-2582
  • Fire Brigade: 2445-0430 or 9919-8960
  • Municipal Police Coxen Hole: 2445-0416
  • Municipal Police Los Fuertes: 2445-3438
  • Red Cross: 3372-2582
  • Fire Brigade: 2445-0430 or 9919-8960

Demographics

Caracoles

The Caracol people are an English-speaking people who have been established in Northern Honduras (specifically, the Bay Islands) since the early 19th century. They are chiefly of European and British-Afro-Caribbean descent. “Caracol” is Spanish for “conch, snail or shell”, and relates the people of the Bay Islands to their unique environment and their seafaring culture. In its current usage, the term “caracol” refers to all people born in the Bay Islands region, and their descendants. The term “caracol” has also been deemed offensive by native Islanders and the term is only used by Spanish-speaking “mainland” Hondurans who have a long standing rivalry with native Bay Islanders because of their differences in culture, language, beliefs and ideals. All native islanders regardless of race, creed or colour prefer the term “Islanders” when being referred to. The region of the Bay Islands encompasses the three major islands of Roatán, Útila and Guanaja, the Hog Islands as well as the smaller islands or cays. These people are also called “Islanders”, especially locally.

garifuna-drummers-honduras-bay-islands-roatan

English is the first language of native islanders regardless of race and Spanish is spoken second, whereas mainland Honduras is Spanish-speaking. It remains this way because of the islands’ past as a British colony with descendants of the British Isles. With the steady influx of mainland Hondurans migrating to the islands, Spanish language use has increased. Because of the tourism and cruise ship industry that supports the islands, English continues to be the first spoken and dominant language among all native island peoples. Over time, the form of English spoken by the Caracol has changed. The language differs mostly in morphology but also in pronunciation and accent and, to a lesser extent, in syntax and vocabulary, from the English of the other British Caribbean colonies, as evidenced by the usage of a wide variety of old standard English terms and words throughout the islands. They are similar enough to be mutually intelligible and understood throughout the entire Bay Islands. The language can also be learned, although it is not taught in the general sense, whilst the accent derives from the wide variety of expatriates living and working on the Islands from North America and Europe.

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